VectorBuilder Inc. and Pall Corporation recently held a signing ceremony in VectorBuilder’s GMP manufacturing facility in Guangzhou, China to officially launch a strategic partnership. VectorBuilder and Pall Corporation will jointly set up the VectorBuilder-Pall Center for Gene Delivery Technologies.

 

By integrating superior technological know-how and advanced instrumentation of the two parties, the center aims to build a technology platform for continuous CDMO process optimization. Situated within VectorBuilder’s GMP facilities, the center features Pall’s small-scale iCELLis® Nano bioreactor and clinical-scale iCELLis 500+ bioreactors along with other equipment.

 

The focus of the center is to optimize adherent-cell-based GMP manufacturing of viral vectors to meet market demands from cell therapy, gene therapy and vaccine applications.

 

“In order to meet the explosive demand for GMP products in the gene delivery space, VectorBuilder has built 100,000 square feet of GMP facilities, and launched a comprehensive CDMO business portfolio for the production of gene therapy drugs and vector-based vaccines”, says Dr. Jason Ye, Vice President of Biomanufacturing at VectorBuilder.

 

“This marks VectorBuilder’s rapid expansion from the research market into the clinical market. It is full of growth opportunities but also has many technical challenges. We therefore very much look forward to this in-depth partnership with Pall. We hope that through the creation of optimized, efficient and automated GMP manufacturing platforms, VectorBuilder will further establish its global leadership in custom viral vector manufacturing.”

 

“We are very pleased to support VectorBuilder as the demand for GMP gene delivery solutions continues to grow” said Dr Clive Glover, General Manager of Pall Corporation’s gene therapy business. “Our broad portfolio uniquely supports these processes with versatile upstream, downstream and fluid handling solutions and we are happy to share our knowledge to help VectorBuilder develop a new generation of efficient, industrial-scale viral vector manufacturing processes”.